Safely Using Loaders

Operating a loader, or any other type of machine can be a dangerous activity if certain guidelines are not followed. A good understanding of working environments and machine capabilities is critical for safe operation.

Listed below are guidelines to follow before, during and after operating a loader (N.B. not all inclusive; always refer to operation and maintenance manual for complete instructions).

Before operating the loader:

  • Obtain a pre-shift checklist if available and complete it accurately. It is important to always record the results of inspections.
  • Review the operation and maintenance manual before operating; know the safety precautions.
  • Inspect the condition of the tires or track shoes for excessive wear, cracks and bulges.
  • Verify all fluids are at the right levels.
  • Inspect the condition of the bucket, nuts, bolts and other wear items for cracks or damage.
  • Verify that there are no rocks, debris or other material that could fall back into the cab.
  • Always wear the proper personal protective equipment for the job. Some applicable forms of PPE include; leather gloves, protective helmets, eye and ear protection and steel toe boots (make sure work boots have good tread).
  • Use caution accessing and exiting the cab of the machine; maintain three points of contact at all times.
  • Verify all gauges are working properly and the inside of the cab is ready for safe use.

Operating the loader:

  • Always wear a seat belt and honk horn before moving the loader.
  • In cold conditions, start the engine and let it run at idle speed for 15 minutes before operating; exercise the bucket up and down a few times to warm the hydraulic oil.
  • Never exceed speed limits and do not make sharp turns or aggressive moves.
  • Never operate on an incline with the load in the raised position (doing so could results in tipping the load or loader).
  • Do not exceed the rated loads for the equipment; always attempt to center the load to the bucket when loading and unloading.
  • Always be aware of surroundings – Use a spotter and know where pedestrians, objects, overhangs, fall hazards, uneven conditions and other vehicles are at all times.

After operating the loader:

  • Let the loader run at idle speed for 5 minutes before completely shutting down.
  • Lower the bucket to ground to avoid stress on hydraulic systems.
  • Clean the loader off with high pressure water before any mud or debris hardens.
  • Inspect and verify the same items before you operated the loader (see above).
  • Shut off the engine before refueling.

World Day for Safety and Health at Work on 28 April 2017

The annual World Day for Safety and Health at Work on 28 April 2017 promotes the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on the magnitude of the problem and on how promoting and creating a safety and health culture can help reduce the number of work-related deaths and injuries.

The ILO celebrates the World Day for Safety and Health at Work on the 28 April to promote the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on emerging trends in the field of occupational safety and health and on the magnitude of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide.

With the celebration of the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, the ILO promotes the creation of a global preventative safety and health culture involving ILO constituents and all key stakeholders in this field. In many parts of the world, national authorities, trade unions, employers’ organizations and safety and health practitioners organize activities to celebrate this date. We invite you to join us in celebrating this significant day and share with us the activities you organize.

The 28 April is also the International Commemoration Day for Dead and Injured Workers organized worldwide by the trade union movement since 1996. Its purpose is to honour the memory of victims of occupational accidents and diseases by organizing worldwide mobilizations and awareness campaigns on this date.

In 2003, the ILO became involved in the April 28 campaign upon request from the trade union movement. While we honour injured and fallen workers, we appreciate and celebrate that these injuries and fatalities can be prevented and reduced, recognizing it as both a day for commemoration and celebration. Since 2003, the ILO observes the World Day on Safety and Health at Work on April 28 capitalizing on its traditional strengths of tripartism and social dialogue.

28 April is seen as a day to raise international awareness on occupational safety and health among trade unions, employers’ organizations and government representatives alike. The ILO acknowledges the shared responsibility of key stakeholders and encourages them to promote a preventive safety and health culture to fulfill their obligations and responsibilities for preventing deaths, injuries and diseases in the workplace, allowing workers to return safely to their homes at the end of the working day.

For more information please visit /safeday

Saiosh call on all Members to observe a minute of silence at 12:00 noon on 28 April 2017 in remembrance of persons that lost their lives in workplace accidents.

Source: SAIOSH

 

Tip of the Month- To Guide Your Company’s Future, Look to Its Past

Each company has its own DNA: a unique strategy and culture that sets it apart from competitors.

To guide an organization’s growth, you need to understand its nature. Start by looking at its past. Dig around in the company archives. Talk to early employees to find out what the organization used to be like and what shaped its beginning. Read the corporate history, if you’ve got one. Look at the original vision and values of the founders. How did they see the world? What problem were they out to solve? How did they believe the business was creating value?

Map what you learn to the company’s current business. Where is there alignment? Where isn’t there? The goal of this exercise isn’t just to increase your understanding of the company; it’s to think about how the company can create value in new ways while staying true to its origins.

Adapted from “How to Discover Your Company’s DNA,” by Mark Bonchek. harvardbusiness.org.