The life of a bicycle

There are so many reasons why a bicycle can be considered the best form of transport (in our humble opinion). It is not only good for our health and bank accounts (did you know that a bicycle is 20 times cheaper to maintain than the average car?), but it is good for the environment as well.

There is now no wonder why there are twice as many bicycles in the world than cars! It is believed that the world manufactures more or less 100 million of them each year, that means that currently over 1 billion bicycles are being used all over the world!

In terms of the environment, it is understood that bicycles save over 238 million gallons of fuel every year. We can also fit about 15 bicycles in the same space that 1 car occupies.

But the best part about riding a bicycle is that it makes us look cool! This is why we were happy to get involved in sponsoring some new bicycles for the staff at Melkbosstrand Private School (MPS). Mr Jaco Smit, the school principle, is quoted as saying;

“You can be sure that this kind gesture will have a positive impact on their lives. They can now drive to and from school instead of walking.  For some of them it is their first bicycle ever!”

Now isn’t that cool?

World Day for Safety and Health at Work on 28 April 2017

The annual World Day for Safety and Health at Work on 28 April 2017 promotes the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on the magnitude of the problem and on how promoting and creating a safety and health culture can help reduce the number of work-related deaths and injuries.

The ILO celebrates the World Day for Safety and Health at Work on the 28 April to promote the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases globally. It is an awareness-raising campaign intended to focus international attention on emerging trends in the field of occupational safety and health and on the magnitude of work-related injuries, diseases and fatalities worldwide.

With the celebration of the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, the ILO promotes the creation of a global preventative safety and health culture involving ILO constituents and all key stakeholders in this field. In many parts of the world, national authorities, trade unions, employers’ organizations and safety and health practitioners organize activities to celebrate this date. We invite you to join us in celebrating this significant day and share with us the activities you organize.

The 28 April is also the International Commemoration Day for Dead and Injured Workers organized worldwide by the trade union movement since 1996. Its purpose is to honour the memory of victims of occupational accidents and diseases by organizing worldwide mobilizations and awareness campaigns on this date.

In 2003, the ILO became involved in the April 28 campaign upon request from the trade union movement. While we honour injured and fallen workers, we appreciate and celebrate that these injuries and fatalities can be prevented and reduced, recognizing it as both a day for commemoration and celebration. Since 2003, the ILO observes the World Day on Safety and Health at Work on April 28 capitalizing on its traditional strengths of tripartism and social dialogue.

28 April is seen as a day to raise international awareness on occupational safety and health among trade unions, employers’ organizations and government representatives alike. The ILO acknowledges the shared responsibility of key stakeholders and encourages them to promote a preventive safety and health culture to fulfill their obligations and responsibilities for preventing deaths, injuries and diseases in the workplace, allowing workers to return safely to their homes at the end of the working day.

For more information please visit /safeday

Saiosh call on all Members to observe a minute of silence at 12:00 noon on 28 April 2017 in remembrance of persons that lost their lives in workplace accidents.

Source: SAIOSH

 

Tip of the Month- To Guide Your Company’s Future, Look to Its Past

Each company has its own DNA: a unique strategy and culture that sets it apart from competitors.

To guide an organization’s growth, you need to understand its nature. Start by looking at its past. Dig around in the company archives. Talk to early employees to find out what the organization used to be like and what shaped its beginning. Read the corporate history, if you’ve got one. Look at the original vision and values of the founders. How did they see the world? What problem were they out to solve? How did they believe the business was creating value?

Map what you learn to the company’s current business. Where is there alignment? Where isn’t there? The goal of this exercise isn’t just to increase your understanding of the company; it’s to think about how the company can create value in new ways while staying true to its origins.

Adapted from “How to Discover Your Company’s DNA,” by Mark Bonchek. harvardbusiness.org.